Wednesday, 5 November 2014

No, Abi, the Poppy Is Not associated with Racism, Nationalism and Islamophobia.

Abi Wilkinson, a generally thoughtful breed of lefty, has nevertheless, in this article, succumbed to the temptation of projecting her prejudices onto something she doesn't understand and in doing so caused some offence. I said I would explain why thought she had written a bad article.

The fact is, poppies have become less a symbol of genuine grief and recognition of the soldiers who have fallen fighting in our country’s armed forces, and more a compulsory signifier that a person is on ‘our side’.
The phrase "The fact is" rarely comes before a fact. But it is easy to see why people could think the Poppy divisive. The men in uniform, the pageantry, the national unity, are redolent to the triumphalism of empire which makes much of the left uncomfortable. They're wrong.

British history has its shameful moments, something the right is often guilty of ignoring, however Remembrance is not the season to dwell on these. Broadly, the British Empire was a force for good, trying to leave Cricket, the Rule of Law, democracy and Railways behind. That this was a stated aim of the British Empire is something the left is loathe to admit. Historians should not be seeking to impose a narrative based on today's values or seek to "prove" something for the benefit of one political view today; rather we should learn the lessons of history, so the horrors can be avoided, and the triumphs learned from. That requires admissions of failure as well as a celebration of successes.

The armed forces who have for four hundred years fought in support of one of the most stable and prosperous democracies on earth, have every right to take pride in the successes, and remember that our freedom is bought with a heavy price. This country took part in, but then dismantled the Global Slave trade, fought European dictators from Napoleon to Hitler, offered a parliamentary model of democracy which has proved itself far more stable than the presidential  model exported by France or the USA. A British soldier has died overseas in the service of his country every year since 1666, with one exception: 1968.

I grew up with the Cold War raging. We, as part of the Alliance of democracies beat international communism, as we defeated European Fascism. The Army I joined was trying to put the former Yugoslavia and Sierra Leone together. And the Army I have served has been in Far off Dusty places for the last decade and a half. The world is undoubtedly a better place for it, taken as a whole, though the merits of each campaign can be debated. Recently the mother lode of bad ideas making people miserable round the world stems from the creed of Radical Islamism. Abi's political ideas were formed when 'the enemy our boys are fighting' were mostly Muslims.

So from there it's a simple mental jump to regard the British Armed Forces are mostly a tool to fight Muslims, conveniently forgetting previous decades, and centuries of idealogies and enemies defeated. And to a limited extent, amongst some people, the poppy has become a 'them and us' symbol. If you don't wear the poppy you are one of "them". This was as true, and to the same extent, for the leftists and communists and Irish, as it is for  Muslims now. It has never been significant.
Propaganda images pitting our soldiers (deserving of state support) and ‘immigrants’ (greedy, reviled and a drain on state resources) are the bread and butter of this [Britain First].
Britain first are capable of putting together emotive Internet memes, but little more. But theirs is not, and will not be the majority or even significant view, though they are tapping into genuine if misinformed hostility to immigration. Most soldiers I know find Britain First's mawkish parasitism on their profession faintly ridiculous. The real experience of remembrance can instead be found at war memorials up and down the country you will see proud men and women, many wearing medal ribbons, remembering those they fought alongside who didn't come home.

Remembrance isn't about the  political posturing at the Cenotaph or people sharing memes on Facebook; and certainly not a Newspapers encouragement of a Poppy hijab. Instead it is about the smaller, more personal ceremonies at village memorials, regimental parade grounds and churches up and down the country. I think of the village on Skye where my Grandfather grew up. There are five houses and a pub. There are eight names on the war memorial. And five more from World War 2. You will not see any hostility there to anyone there. Just bow your head and reflect why we have the freedom to speak freely to our rulers and how dearly it has been bought.

Last year saw my Unit's wreath laid at Westminster Abby. The year before that, I was on an Army base. The year before that, with my Brother in Yorkshire. So my experience of Remembrance is likely to be very different to Abi's, who I suspect is not moved as I am by the sacrifices of our Soldiers, nor as proud of what they have achieved.

Wear a Poppy. Don't wear a poppy. Wear a  white poppy if you think such private pride and grief is really something you feel needs challenging. Thousands of men died in Normandy 70 years ago in part for your right to do so. Abi's journalistic mistake is to imagine her experience of Remembrance, filtered through a miasma of political beliefs, and distorted by selection bias and availability heuristic, and imagine it to be universal. I would invite her to Remembrance ceremony with me next year to see for herself.



4 comments:

Ravenscar. said...

Hmm..... oh dear,

Left wing bovine emissions.

And typical dross from a girl who is very trying but not trying hard enough. Plus, a confused article where non sequiturs and straw men abound.
Why is that, the left constantly, incessantly wish to prostrate themselves on the altar of faux umbrage?
Damn it, sanctimony is a very unrefreshing human trait and taking umbrage on behalf of those who would clearly scoff at Abi's pathetic effort - is er well wasted effort.

I have good reason to wear mine [poppy] but only choose to wear the poppy at certain times, only in the week before Armistice Commemoration.
If anyone should spurn the poppy, then that is their look-out but don't expect me to be sympathetic to their mores, wishes and creed.

Moreover,

I don't like people wearing the poppy because everyone else does, although wearing it does demonstrate a certain respect and empathy with the fallen, all should be aware of that.

I never feel wearing mine own poppy makes me nationalistic, it makes me proud to stand and remember those who went before me and in the name of and defending my country and for that they will always be respected.
I honour the flag, it is in the colours of my country, I am not happy when my flag is besmirched and I am not happy when my country is denigrated by those living here and under its protection but at the end of the day I believe in free speech and no one but no one is stopping them leaving these shores, so if you don't like it....

you know what to do.

Anonymous said...

Or maybe Abi is just a leftist cunt...

Simon Jester said...

I tried reading her column three times. Each time, I gave up, moaning, "Arrrggghhh... the stupid... it BURNS..."

Anonymous said...

What kind of idiotic twat would make
such nonsense out of a simple and well deserved sign of remembrance and respect.

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