Thursday, 28 May 2015

on the Psychoactive substances bill

America has a law called the "Federal Analogue Act" which attempts to do what the Conservatives are planning to do with the Psychoactive substances bill in the Queen's speech. It didn't work in the 'States, and it won't work here. It's vague: What does "substantially similar" mean. How can you prove it's for human consumption? As a result, it's hardly been used. 


Worse than it being pointless, what it is trying to do is dangerous.

"Designer drugs" are dangerous: they're untested, the side-effects are unknown and the metabolism is often slow. People have died, because they don't know how, or how much to take of any substance, which may be highly toxic. Why then do people take them? Because they can't get the stimulant, Cocaine; relaxant, Marijuana or the Halucinogenic, LSD or Psilocybin they want, and these "designer drugs" are "legal" and therefore thought by users to be safer than the "killer drugs" that have been banned.

People have been told "drugs kill". But we know what the lethal doses are for LSD, Psilocybin, THC and Cocaine hydrochloride. There isn't one. (It's about 6 litres for water, and about 300ml for Alcohol by comparison). These compounds aren't "safe", and have deleterious effects on physical and mental health, especially with long-term use. But their dangers are a known quantity, just like they are for alcohol. People have been smoking Marijuana, and eating hallucinogenic fungi for millennia. These, really should be considered no different to alcohol. Chewing Coca leaves is a prophylactic against altitude sickness, and a stimulant effect a bit stronger than coffee and are legal in much of South America. So why are they banned here? 

Habit.

And the prohibition of stimulants and psychoactive substances has led to exactly the same death and carnage that prohibition of alcohol did in the USA. A business of enormous profitability has been gifted to criminals. Billions have been spend interdicting supply rather than taxing use and profits from the recreational drug business. This is stupid.

And now, any Chemistry graduate can synthesise novel chemicals, and sell them as "plant food", and people will try to take them to get high. This only happens because reasonably safe compounds are banned, and the ban enforced with all the power the law affords.

This habit is INSANE, and it's only supported because the scientific literature is focussed on how to make the drug war work, rather than on working out what and why drugs do what they do, and what to do about it when people take them. All "experts" are from the Law Enforcement/Medical prohibition complex. Banning more substances is just a regulatory whack-a-mole with cis/trans isomers, making matters WORSE not better.

Instead of assuming all drug use is bad, accept that people have always, and always will, like to get off their tits from time to time. Sure, tax the products, like alcohol and tobacco, through the nose if necessary to cover policing costs, quality control and healthcare. Most people will treat Marijuana like they do Merlot: something pleasant to have at the end of the day. Cocaine: A bit like they do Tequila: Something to put rocket-fuel into a night out. A few will become dangerously hooked, as they do right now with alcohol.

My guess is that were recreational narcotics legal, there would be more Marijuana and Cocaine use, and less Alcohol and Heroin. LSD and Magic Mushrooms are not seriously habit forming. They weren't a problem when Psilocybins cubensis could be bought openly in Camden head shops pre 2005, and they won't be a problem after they're made legal again. The harms from all drugs would probably go down thanks to a safer supply chain, and the tax revenue would help the Government balance the books. All those drug-warriors in the police could be re-deployed to something socially useful, like enforcing parking offences or stopping littering.

No country to liberalise drugs laws has seen any major problems, despite heroic efforts of the bansturbationists to manufacture evidence to the contrary. Yet the major problem with prohibition: an illegal and unregulated supply chain remains in place. Imagine the good that could be done were the criminals, and their profits removed from the business.

You want to stop dangerous "designer drugs"? Legalise and regulate the relatively safe stuff that's currently banned.



3 comments:

Burgers said...

Nothing to add Jackart - excellent post.

Simon Jester said...

'You want to stop dangerous "designer drugs"? Legalise and regulate the relatively safe stuff that's currently banned.'

Instead of thinking up even more bans on relatively safe, traditional narcotics:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khat#United_Kingdom

Anonymous said...

On a point of detail:
No-one has the slightest difficulty getting the hallucinogen Psilocybin. Unless it's a dry August.

There was an error in this gadget