Thursday, 23 July 2015

Supporting Labour as Virtue Signalling.

Imagine you're not very politically engaged. You're reading this blog, which probably means you can name the whole cabinet. Most people could probably recognise the PM, Chancellor and Home Secretary, but only name two of the three confidently. This isn't stupidity, it's rational ignorance. The reading necessary to keep up with the day-to-day doings of politicians chases out other, potentially more worthwhile activities. Sport for example. Or spending time with the kids. Being knowledgeable about politics simply isn't much use. We political animals find it very difficult to put ourselves in the minds of people who don't immerse themselves in issues.

Right?

OK.

So imagine now the issue in question is "benefits", specifically cuts to them. Do you wish to signal that you are a nice person? Then you loudly opine that "how could you increase poverty?" You're against the benefit cuts because you care about people less well off than yourself. Therefore anyone who does support benefit cuts is a bad person. Stands to reason.

"But", you might say, "there are incentive effects: look at the increase in low-waged unemployment. That is, in the long-run a much better route out of poverty than generous benefits which merely trap people into state dependency. Much better to give people the habit of work and the hope of long-term advancement it brings".

Your non-engaged audience lost you at "incentive effects", and their take home is you want to take money out of the pockets of poor people because "blah blah blah". It is much easier and safer in an online world to say the easy, left wing thing. We live in an online world where your every utterance can be dug back up, taken out of context, extrapolated to the point of ridiculousness, more or less forever. Saying "benefit cuts are evil" isn't going to lose you supporters. Saying "The Tories have a point, actually, perhaps tax-credits should be cut" will. Liberal economics is harder to express in a tweet than socialist economics. Liberty's benefits are distributed and harder to point to. Socialism offers solutions that are easy, simple to understand, and wrong.

However out in the real world, people see benefits recipients, and resent paying for them. And down the pub, where conversations, rather than tweets happen, you don't need to signal virtue by trite political opinion. You can do it by standing a round. People aren't morons. They know how people work and with a bit of thought, the Tories make sense. Down the pub, cuts to benefits are popular.

Labour's mistake is to take the lazy virtue-signalling on social media as what people actually think.



3 comments:

Auralay said...

Any time you feel the need to signal virtue, mines any single malt from the western isles.
Cheers, Auralay.

Anonymous said...

Down the pub, cuts to benefits are popular.

....and down *real* pubs, unlike the ones populated by one percenters such as yourself, UKIP are even more popular still.

Hurrah, trebles all round!

Jackart said...

That, anon, must be why UKIP won so many seats at the elec.... oh. Nope, UKIP are utter scum. But I am glad you assume I am successful. I assume you're not.

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